Pouring the concrete slab

Poised ready to pour

Poised ready to pour

This weekend we saw a gap in the weather which would enable us to pour concrete without fear of it freezing before it had set. Although we were nearly let down by the concrete suppliers, we just managed to get the job done but it was close.

We had intended pouring it 5 days previously but we were stopped by low temperatures and a layer of snow. We postponed the pour and agreed to watch the weather. Thursday, and Stan called to say the pour could be on for the Friday. He then called back to say every man and his dog were after concrete on the Friday because of the cold spell so we would book for Saturday first thing which would give us 2 days for the concrete to go off before it got cold again. Problem solved, or so we thought,

Keeping concrete out of the service ducts

Keeping concrete out of the service ducts

Saturday came and I was woken in my caravan at half six by the sounds of diggers starting up and loud banter from the transit vans. The concrete was due at 7.30 apparently and there was still a little prep work to do before pouring it.

By 8am, there was an air of anti-climax. The concrete firm called to say the plant in Edinburgh was closed and we would have to wait until they got three deliveries to us from Fife, another hour’s drive away. Expect them around 2pm, they said.

Much disgruntlement from the lads who had got up at half four to get to site. Still they got stuck into the sewage treatment plant and soakway, as well as a box of doughnuts and some bacon butties.

Concrete transferred by digger

Concrete transferred by digger

2pm and the first wagon arrived. Rather than pour the concrete straight onto the steelwork, Stan chose to have it poured into a bucket on the fork lift, then he poured it carefully a bucket at a time into just the spot it was needed. This meant the lads only needed to move a little bit of concrete around at any given time which made the process far quicker.

Pouring the house slab

Pouring the house slab

45 minutes and 3 concrete lorries later, the concrete slabs were coming together. Levelled to within a centimetre across the width of the house then smoothed down with a giant trowel, the house started to look like a house for the first time.

    The finished slab. The timber frame sits on top of the blue damp proof membrane, then we add insulation and under floor heating to build the floor up.

The finished slab. The timber frame sits on top of the blue damp proof membrane, then we add insulation and under floor heating to build the floor up.

 

Ready now for the timber frame kit which arrives in just over a week’s time. Then the walls start going up and we’ll really see what we’ve got ourselves into!

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